Kyle Peets

  • Wood, drywall, steel, paint, fans; 15′ x 11′ x 11′

  • I went shopping at Walmart for an assortment of products that make noise. I then staged a 15 minute concert for the “performers,” complete with laser lights and a fog machine, an amplified paper shredder, air purifier, air-conditioning unit, and electric razor. The event included a merchandise table with screen printed posters, t-shirts and even the Blender’s solo album (which is very good). I recorded the concert and then slipped a CD of the performance back into the original packaging of the products and returned them to Walmart. The CD became historical evidence of the “performers” brief yet exciting vacation from their shelves.

Kyle Peets, Performance and Conceptual Installation, Ashland, OR 
In Residence: June 5th – July 27th, 2017
Reception: Thursday, July 27th; 6-8pm

During his time at PlatteForum, Kyle Peets will work with PlatteForum’s ArtLab interns to create their own “game,” beset with its own logic, rules, outcomes, uniforms and venues.

“I hope to use my sense of play and poetics at the Platte Forum Artist Residency as creative tools for re-imagining the way we use arbitrary notions of taste to define high and low culture. I am proposing to facilitate a project called, THE BIG GAME, where participants in the Learning Labs will invent and physically build a new sport that will eventually be played at the end of the residency. Everything about the new sport, including its internal logic and vernacular, to creating all of the entertainment and paraphernalia that make it a spectacle will be designed and fabricated by the Learning Lab participants. It is my hope that through building the sport the youth will link the spectacle of the sporting event to contemporary art by demonstrating that the design elements that make a sporting event are similar to the principles of design that are considered when making art. Additionally, through creating the rules and logic of a new sport the participants will recognize the arbitrary forces that influence our identities as socially constructed and not innate.”

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